New Year Blessing

 

On the winter solstice a few friends joined me on my patio, all of us masked and sitting in a circle several feet apart, for an afternoon of writing together. The nights were cold that week of the conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn, the mornings crisp, but at one-thirty on the sunny patio it was too warm for us to believe that winter had really arrived.

Sarojani looked up and asked Barbara, the painter, “What color blue is this sky?”

“Cerulean,” she answered.

We took off sweaters, put on broad-brimmed hats, and I read John O’Donohue’s poem “In Praise of Fire” as a blessing for us and also as a prompt for the writing we would do together:

As short as the time

From spark to flame,

So brief may the distance be

Between heart and being.

For thirty minutes in the Santa Cruz sunshine, we labored over notebooks and laptop, seeking that secret inspired place in each of us that might birth a poem, that could reveal the depths of what we really know. On the shortest day of the year the sun dips quickly, and cool shadows were spreading across the garden as we shared what we’d written. My poem began

May each new drop of light

in the lengthening days

fall into the dark well

where anyone might forget

the names we are called to say.

Even in the dark

may we remember …

“You write a lot of prayers,” Barbara pointed out when I finished and then, noticing John O’Donohue’s book on the table, asked, “What’s the difference between a prayer and a blessing?”

Well, that’s easy, I thought, but as I tried to formulate an answer, I was flummoxed. Are they the same? Is a blessing a form of prayer? Kim suggested that a prayer is offered, a blessing is bestowed. After they left, I pulled my Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary off the shelf and looked up the verb to bless. Maybe part of the reason I was confused when I tried to answer Barbara’s question is that blessing carries multiple meanings:

  1. Hallow or consecrate by religious rite or word
  2. Hallow with the sign of the cross
  3. Invoke divine care for (bless your heart)
  4. Praise, glorify (bless his holy name)
  5. Approve, speak well of.

To pray has fewer definitions in my dictionary:

  1. Make a request in a humble manner
  2. Address God or a god with adoration, confession, supplication or thanksgiving.

As I’d thought, there is overlap between these two actions. To invoke divine care or to praise God is both to bless and to pray, but that first definition of bless, to hallow or consecrate by religious rite or word, seemed to stand alone.

In my Catholic tradition the power to consecrate rests in the hands of the ordained priest. I learned this at age eight when I made my First Holy Communion. Only the priest can perform the sacramental rite that turns ordinary bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ. Yet he clearly isn’t a magician. He calls on the power of God to make the bread and wine holy. Only through divine action does transubstantiation take place. I think my first instinct was correct, blessing is a form of prayer, and so was Kim’s, a prayer is offered, a blessing bestowed.

The day I put on my white lace dress and veil to make my First Communion, my grandmother gave me a rosary as a gift. After Mass my mother took me to our pastor to ask for his blessing on it. He made a Sign of the Cross over the beads while saying some words I couldn’t quite hear, maybe something like this prayer I found online: may those who devoutly use this rosary to pray be blessed, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. “Amen,” my mother finished, and I quickly copied her. Although I wouldn’t have used Merriam-Webster’s words to describe what happened, it was clearly something special, yet now that I think about it, not so different from one of the very first prayers I learned, grace before dinner: Bless us, O Lord, and these Thy gifts …

Objects and buildings, animals and people may all receive a blessing, and John O’Donohue believes that as human beings we each have the power to give a blessing too. “I never doubted that I could bless,” Kim shared during our gathering on the winter solstice, but despite learning to say grace from an early age, as a Catholic it took me a long time to realize, and I thank the role models who showed me that I too could perform this priestly act. Over the years I have joined in a blessing way for a pregnant mother, led ritual cleansings of new homes, laid hands on sick friends, blessed travelers, knit prayers into shawls, and anointed women with water from Brigit’s sacred well in Ireland.

“It would be lovely if we could rediscover our power to bless one another,” John O’Donohue says in his book To Bless the Space Between Us. “Despite all the darkness, human hope is based on the instinct that at the deepest level of reality some intimate kindness holds sway. This is the heart of blessing.”

At the end of an apocalyptic year, still in the midst of a global pandemic, at the beginning of what will likely be a hard winter, I believe with John O’Donohue that an intimate kindness prevails, and I call on this kindness to bless you and keep you. When you find yourself in darkness, may it shine upon you.

Published by

Mary Camille Thomas

Mary Camille Thomas is a native of Santa Cruz, California who considers herself lucky to be back after living in Davis, Germany, Los Angeles, Holland, and on the road in a motorhome. She is a librarian by profession, and her poetry has appeared in the Porter Gulch Review and Sisters Singing: Blessings, Prayers, Art, Songs and Sacred Stories by Women. She is is currently working on a novel called Schatz and a collection of poems of the spirit.

11 thoughts on “New Year Blessing”

  1. Thank you, Mary for the wisdom and hope that this evokes. As we are blessed in our originalities so are we empowered with that love to offer outward.
    May it be so.
    As it was, is and always will be………

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  2. Dear One,

    What a joy this morning! And I can see you all so clearly… So good to my heart. Beautiful, inspiring piece, Mary.

    Blessings to you always for this new year which began on the Solstice, the day of which you write, and will be another year of revelation and new worlds unfolding in all directions. Grateful for blessing of sharing it with you.

    Much love,

    Carolyn

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    1. Dear Carolyn, when I think about it, I realize that gathering on my patio would never have happened if not for you! Thank you for the writing community you have created, truly food for the soul, and for being a role model of blessing for me. Looking forward to writing with you in the New Year.

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  3. Thank you for this thoughtful interlude, and Blessings on your dear head, dear Mary,
    And blessings be with all the life-giving artists, poets ,painters ,potters., et al

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  4. My daughter-in-law’s mother, born in Mexico, blessed her children and grandchildren at night and when saying good-bye. She died several years ago, and since then, I’ve blessed our mutual grandchildren in her memory. It’s a beautiful custom, and I always feel blessed as well. The power of such a ritual cannot be underestimated. Thank you, Mary, for helping us articulate what it means.

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    1. That is a lovely ritual that you’ve adopted. I’ve wondered before about whether blessings could be a secular tradition, and I gather from this writing that yes, they can.

      I appreciate the tradition of naming the departed as noted in the poem. It’s a practice my mother and I picked up at a winter solstice celebration years ago and have gratefully continued.

      Thanks, Sylvia and Mary both for sharing.

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  5. Dear Mary…this is an inspirational piece…thank you…i read it a number of times…the questions and answers, it’s ‘intimate kindness’… it’s a blessing portrait of our writing gatherings and of our individual and communal search for what is true and what we can offer to each other… ‘from spark to flame’ let it spiral out. I feel so blessed to be a part of all of this….with love, barbara

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